Welcome

Welcome to my Law blog specifically intended as an aid to law students. I will post comments and white papers, from time to time, and I am happy to carry on conversations with students who are in need of help in law school.


I am most conservative and appropriate in my approach so if you comment and/or have questions to ask, please do so with an equal degree of appropriateness.



I am a Professor of Law at Concord Law School, an Internet Law School located in Los Angeles, though I live, teach and otherwise work out of Lakewood, Colorado, resting up against the foothills just west of Denver.

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THIS SITE IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH, APPROVED BY, OFFICIALLY REPRESENTATIVE OF OR FINANCIALLY SUPPORTED BY CONCORD LAW SCHOOL OR ITS AFFILIATES OR PARENT COMPANIES.

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I have no set schedule of posting, but I hope you will check in from time to time.

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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

3 - TV Ain't Real, Dude


TV AIN’T REAL, DUDE

The question is posed by students, from time to time, and it is intimated even more often: Can I learn anything about being a lawyer from the TV/Lawyer shows? Is it appropriate to act like the lawyers I see on TV?

Frankly, I enjoy certain of these shows, but as my wife will attest, I often grumble, complain and offer commentary throughout the shows. Certainly some of what happens on these shows bears a semblance of reality, but not very often. The reasons?

1. TV ain’t real, dude. It is make believe. And, in my humble opinion, even when we see “Based on a true story,” we ought to be leery of the meaning of the word, “based.”

2. A TV show may last for a half hour, an hour or maybe two, and within that time characters are developed, a crime is committed, the police catch the alleged perpetrator, attorneys bargain and posture, the case goes to trial, a verdict is rendered and all live happily ever after. Whether the matter is criminal or civil, in reality a case may go on for years.

3. TV is entertainment. The legal process, while perhaps entertaining to an attorney, is seldom entertaining to a client.

4. These folks are actors. Judges, attorneys and clients are real people. Act like an actor on TV? Rather, act like an intelligent, decent human being.

So, let’s get fantasy out of our heads. Legal work is WORK. It can be fun, but it is also a serious, demanding, tedious and devastating business, but a job well done will, most of the time, mean the world to the client who may seldom know the extent of the time you have put in. Your sweat! Your angst!

Law school is the very cornerstone of the business of lawyering. Studying and learning the law can be fun and rewarding, but it is still serious, demanding, tedious and devastating business. Discipline yourself now for what is to come. If you do, your life after law school could be most rewarding.

Professor Holden
© 2009 Douglas S. Holden. All Rights Reserved.


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