Welcome

Welcome to my Law blog specifically intended as an aid to law students. I will post comments and white papers, from time to time, and I am happy to carry on conversations with students who are in need of help in law school.


I am most conservative and appropriate in my approach so if you comment and/or have questions to ask, please do so with an equal degree of appropriateness.



I am a Professor of Law at Concord Law School, an Internet Law School located in Los Angeles, though I live, teach and otherwise work out of Lakewood, Colorado, resting up against the foothills just west of Denver.

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I have no set schedule of posting, but I hope you will check in from time to time.

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Monday, January 4, 2010

6 - The IRAC Template

THE IRAC TEMPLATE


When you write a law school essay, here is the IRAC template to follow:

Let's assume there are two main issues. It is critical that you deal with one issue at a time, through the conclusion for that issue. Don't combine issues! Deal with them one at a time.

It is critical that you deal with one party at a time. Don't combine parties! Deal with them one at a time.

When you state a rule (legal definition – rule of law) for a main issue, check to see how many elements (parts) there are in the definition. If there is more than one element, it is critical that EACH element be stated as a sub-issue to the main issue. Remember, you should follow the IRAC model for each and every sub-issue. The sequence is: Main issue #1, rule for main issue #1 (assume two elements in this rule), sub-issue #1 (for main issue #1), rule for sub-issue #1, analysis for sub-issue #1, conclusion for sub-issue #1. Sub-issue #2, rule for sub-issue #2, analysis for sub-issue #2, conclusion for sub-issue #2. Conclusion for main issue #1. Now you can move on to Main issue #2.

It is critical that you read the "Call of the Question" FIRST – before you read the facts and most certainly BEFORE you panic because you have no clue how to begin!!

The call of the question is usually in the last paragraph, last sentence and may simply be a question (or “Interrogatory”) to which you are to respond. It is the question that the writer of the exam wants you to answer.

IRAC Template

Issue Statement: Main Issue 1

Rule Statement for main issue 1 (containing 2 elements)

Sub-Issue #1: This will be the 1st element listed in the rule for main issue 1

Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #1

Analysis re: Sub-Issue #1. Application of the facts to the Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #1

Conclusion re: Sub-Issue #1.

Sub-Issue #2: This will be the 2nd element listed in the rule for main issue 1

Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #2

Analysis re: Sub-Issue #2. Application of the facts to the Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #2

Conclusion re: Sub-Issue #2.

Conclusion re: Main Issue 1

Issue Statement: Main Issue 2

Rule Statement for the main issue 2 (containing 2 elements)

Sub-Issue #1: This will be the 1st element listed in the rule for main issue 2

Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #1

Analysis re: Sub-Issue #1. Application of the facts to the Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #1

Conclusion re: Sub-Issue #1.

Sub-Issue #2: This will be the 2nd element listed in the rule for main issue 2

Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #2

Analysis re: Sub-Issue #2. Application of the facts to the Rule Statement for Sub-Issue #2

Conclusion re: Sub-Issue #2.

Conclusion re: Main Issue 2

Congratulations. Your essay is finished.

Next, I will write you a sample essay answer using the IRAC Model.

Professor Doug Holden
© 2009 Douglas S. Holden. All Rights Reserved.


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