Welcome

Welcome to my Law blog specifically intended as an aid to law students. I will post comments and white papers, from time to time, and I am happy to carry on conversations with students who are in need of help in law school.


I am most conservative and appropriate in my approach so if you comment and/or have questions to ask, please do so with an equal degree of appropriateness.



I am a Professor of Law at Concord Law School, an Internet Law School located in Los Angeles, though I live, teach and otherwise work out of Lakewood, Colorado, resting up against the foothills just west of Denver.

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I have no set schedule of posting, but I hope you will check in from time to time.

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Monday, September 6, 2010

16 – The Privilege of Being an Attorney - The Privileged Path and Sacrifice: Faith, Family and Football

16 – The Privilege of Being an Attorney - The Privileged Path and Sacrifice:
Faith, Family and Football

Years ago, I had the privilege of sitting in a small room with a limited number of people and listen to Tom Landry speak. For those who do not know who Tom Landry is, he is the late, legendary football coach of the Dallas Cowboys. I’m not sure this was the title of his talk, but he spoke of his priorities in life. He described them as “Faith, Family and Football.”

Coach Landry later died of cancer, but listening to him impacted me greatly. I knew these things, of course, but this “living legend” spoke with courage and conviction, but yet with grace and humility. He was soft-spoken, kind and friendly. Good characteristics for anyone.

Well, I’m not necessarily endorsing “Faith, Family and Football,” but what I took Coach Landry to be saying was that the priorities of life are most important. To this football coach, Tom Landry rated faith first, then family and finally his occupation and life-long pursuit, last. Do you find that interesting? I certainly understood it, but to see someone like Tom Landry advocate it was really something.

The pursuit of a legal career is demanding – emotionally demanding, time demanding, character-demanding. It starts in law school and virtually never ends. It will take its toll on one’s faith, family, health, friendships – pretty much everything. So what do you do about it? First and foremost, develop your priorities and visit that list often. Do you need more time to study? Work? This is YOUR career choice, so YOU should make the sacrifice. Don’t require that of others. Don’t steal from those things on the top of the list. Decide now how you will handle it. Put up signs all around you to look at – and remember. YOU can put up with a bit less sleep. You can take time from your hobby rather than from time with your spouse and children.

Law school lasts for three or four years. Life continues after that.

Think it through. Make good choices.

Professor Doug Holden
© 2010. Douglas S. Holden. All rights Reserved.

2 comments:

  1. A bit of guidance given to me from a bible study: "No amount of career success will make up for failure with God or at home." I try every morning to prioritize my day with this in mind. Jennifer Huerta, 1L

    ReplyDelete